Five Questions for 2015

It’s the first day of March and I a doing a “look back at 2014″ post. Hmmm…..

It is a little late in the year for this, but I was attracted to these “5 Questions to Make the Most of 2015”  and their accompanying quotes so I decided to give them a shot. Retrospection is never really out of style especially if it helps you improve.

When did I kick ass?

“Celebrate what you want to see more of.” – Tom Peters

If I kicked ass in 2014, it was either:

A cumulative set of small things (like honoring the soldiers of Camp Gordon Johnston almost every day, demonstrating accountability in my workouts, consistently using Charity Miles to earn money for causes I love via my workouts)

StanleyDuPlanti

or …

Successfully biting my tongue during my daily drives with my father in law. It has been a struggle to “be the adult” when being told how to drive, having my motives for working questioned, or being berated for taking the time to lure the cat in after he (again) left the door open accidentally.

However – you know who’s the real badass in this situation? He is. For dealing with the loss of his spouse of 55 years, for dealing with decades of debilitating chronic pain, for waiting interminable amounts of time for diagnostic tests to explain the latest health issue, for having zero control in a world where he is accustomed to being in charge.

When was I most alive?

“Don’t ask what the world needs. Ask what makes you come alive, and go do it. Because what the world needs is people who have come alive.” – Howard Thurman10409403_10152149271486315_2859153504720087386_n

Easy: the week I spent in El Salvador and the week I spent in NYC.

Also, any time I was on an FSU film set.

And when I was scared to death and completely out of my element auditioning for a musical (then when I took a lesson to try to at least improve the piece and redeem myself). It was still below par musically but clawing myself up from awful to mediocre felt very, very alive.

When was I bored?

“The opposite of happiness is not sadness, but boredom.” – Tim Ferriss

“Here’s a great definition of boredom: The absence of growth.”

I was bored at work. Therefore I left.

Note: At no time in almost 20 years was I ever bored with the cause of providing quality, affordable health care to children. I was bored with the way my responsibilities were playing out. I was feeling the itch to do more communications and incorporate social media into my work life. Neither of those were options. I have only written one blog post about why I left, and it’s not about boredom, but here it is.

Who were my teachers this year? Whom did I teach?

“You are the average of the five people with whom you spend the most time.” – Jim Rohn

I have actually had a placeholder to do an entire blog about this idea — I read about it previously in the blogs of one of the Lead Change Group Leading Voices.

The answer to the “five people” question is:

My husband, Wayne

My father-in-law, Wayne

My son, Wayne Kevin (do we see a theme here?)

The online community

My Toastmasters group

My husband has taught me to ask for things I don’t feel like I can get. My father-in-law has taught me to check and make sure the door is really closed so that cat doesn’t get out! My son has taught me that the people who seem the least observant are sometimes quite the opposite. My online community has taught me it is okay to ask for help. My Toastmasters group  has taught me to tell my story with fewer double clutches. (A double clutch is when a word or phrase is repeated such as “She played basketball played basketball well.”)

Who have I taught? I enjoyed being a first-time mentor to a new Toastmasters member. Maybe some other lessons I have taught will come home to roost. We’ll see.

What mattered most?

“The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena…who spends himself on a worthy cause” – Theodore Roosevelt

Family. Always has, always will.

1524302_10151765847226315_1262914262_o

Do these questions pique  your curiosity as they did mine? Give them a look and let me know what you think!

Fred’s Drive-By Shooting

When Mama Kat proposed the following writing prompt a few weeks ago:

Write a 26-line poem using all the letters of the alphabet, where the first line starts with the letter “A,” the second “B,” the third “C,” etc., culminating with the final line starting with “Z.”

I knew I had to give it a go! We are at the starting line of my effort — see you at the finish!

Flash 2015 12K Race Shirt

Flash 2015 Race Shirt

At the 7.2 mile mark of my 7.46 mile race yesterday, I was sad that my heart was

Beating SO fast that I had to stop to

Collect data via my patient assistant, after which I

Decided to walk the last portion of the race

Except the

Finish line.

Grouped around the finish line were the volunteers and

Huddled clumps of finishers and supporters braving the cold to see the last runners

Ignite their muscles for their last victorious sprints.

Just after putting the patient assistant away, my mind

Kept grappling with the fact that I had not taken

Lots of pictures before the race like I usually do; no flat

Mama for my Moms Run This Town Facebook Page or Instagram,

Nothing. So many missed

Opportunities to share my excitement with friends and raise awareness for the

People for whom I am running the NYC Half Marathon on a date that is

Quickly approaching! Our

Running

Stories, though, are much deeper than pictures can tell. Even so, imagine how

Tickled and1585 Paula Kiger

Utterly surprised I was when race photographer Fred Deckert pulled up in his

Vehicle as he was leaving and did a “drive-by” shooting

Which resulted in a picture from day

XXI in February 2015 that has a bit of a “drive by blur” effect

Yet allows me to share my

Zeal for making every finish line count!

Finish Line Count

Why I Agreed to the “Human Microchip”

I have been doing heart rate-based (HRT) training since April 2012. HRT focuses on the athlete training to certain heart rate zones rather than focusing on pace, speed, distance, or perceived effort. Read this post from RunRunLive for a great basic explanation.

Setting your heart rate zones involves a max HR test and threshold testing (at least the way I have done it). Mine have been revised since I started, but they currently are:

HR Zones

Signs of an Issue

From April 2012 through February 2013, my HRT was going just fine. The first sign of any issue was the Flash 12K on February 16, 2013, when my Max HR was 229, well above my aerobic capacity of 186. I sort of wrote that incident off as a fluke.

I became less able to call my HR issues a fluke during the Summer Trail series of 2014. Granted, running in Tallahassee in the middle of the summer is an invite to strenuous running, but it did not feel right. I had to stop and walk several times to allow my HR to come down when it climbed above 200.

As I wrote in my Turkey Trot 2014 Race Report, the HR issues became more pronounced and more frequent, especially at the Boston Mini Marathon and the Turkey Trot (then at the Swamp Forest Race on January 3, 2015).

The Process of Finding an Answer

Right before the Boston Mini Marathon, I had been cleared by a cardiologist after a ten-minute stress test and a cardiac echocardiogram. After the Boston Mini Marathon, I called him back and asked to reassess. That is when he referred me to an electrophysiologist.

Twice (at least) the first cardiologist said “at some point you may have to get a loop recorder.” Twice (at least) I said “oh if it comes to that I won’t go as far as to have something implanted under my skin.”

When I met with the Dr. Silberman, the electrophysiologist, he reminded me that “you can still stay fit without running.” (I know, all you runners out there ……. I hear you laughing at the screen!). To his credit, he also recognized that running is quite possibly saving my sanity. (Also, I contend that as a runner I avoid so many health problems that would make me costly to CHP: diabetes, blood pressure issues, problems brought on by unhealthy BMI, etc.)

He explained that the implantable loop recorder really is the best option to help him gather information. One likely diagnosis is Atrial Fibrillation (which is described here).

Since the incidents occur sporadically, some diagnostic procedures will not yield the data he needs. Therefore, I agreed to what my teammates and I have come to fondly refer to as “my human microchip.” It looks like this:

LINQ

 

(And if you want to see exactly where it is, click this link. I am not a fan of subjecting people to “wounds” or other TMI pictures on social media but by the same token if it helps with education, I don’t mind. (This picture was taken the day after implantation; it is a tiny little scar now.)

So Much Waiting

And now I wait. I wait while my microchip records (and transmits data to my electrophysiologist’s office nightly). I wait for an incident to happen so I can use my handheld “patient assistant” to mark the incident.

Patient Assistant

Next Steps

After sufficient data is collected to give the Dr. Silberman the data he needs, I have a couple of choices:

  • An ablation, in which the short-circuit is corrected via radiofrequency energy
  • Plan B (ps – I don’t know what Plan B is…)

Medication is not an option because my blood pressure is already on the low side, and most medications would exacerbate that. I assume Plan B would involve life style changes, such as less caffeine and less racing. I really don’t know right now.

Putting It All Together

This title may be mislabeled because this situation does not feel “together” yet. I can tell you the questions/concerns swirling through my mind:

  • It is strange when people describe the various heart rhythm disturbances by saying “one kills you instantly and one only heightens your stroke risk.” I simply don’t see the value of that “only” before “heightens your stroke risk.”
  • I have stopped drinking caffeine prior to my runs. In 2005, during a previous set of cardiac evaluations, Dr. Batchelor advised me to stop drinking caffeine. About a thousand gallons of Diet Coke (before I stopped in January 2013) and coffee later, I have to admit that he may not have been making a passing suggestion.
  • I am so grateful for the people who look out for me and who share their stories. For Shannon Sullivan, who was basically going to put me under house arrest until I asked the cardiologist who had just cleared me to refer me on to Dr. Silberman, for Mary Jean Yon, who has been so  helpful by sharing her story (and telling me to not be so conservative that I don’t get data!), and to David Yon who is the best, most supportive researcher you could possibly want on your side. All of them have encouraged me to a) stay healthy and b) not throw the towel in on running.
  • All of the technology involved in this process is simultaneously reassuring and question-raising. When I had my loop recorder implanted, the Medtronic representative was present. When I had my first in-office visit, he was present. What happens if Medtronic changes hands? (I know there will be contingency plans but I have seen a few awkward situations among my relatives who have pacemaker/defibrillators and can’t resist questioning.)
  • I miss running free of worry. I know I am fortunate compared to the challenges many runners face. It is simply not a relaxing or release-filled time for me in my running life.
  • I have to “let go” of so many concerns about what others think. Dr. Silberman advised if I am having an episode to lie down and get in a sit-up position to break the cycle of whatever is going on electrically for me. That just sounds like an attention-getter (but if it saves my life, who cares?). I feel self-conscious about the fact that I represent my incredible team, KR Endurance, but with the fact that my times are getting slower, not faster, what kind of example am I of the incredible work our coaches do?

I love running and the running community. Now that I have shared my situation with runner friends, people are coming out of the woodwork to discuss their own experiences. I am not alone in having a health challenge, and I know wherever this process takes me, I am fortunate to have the support of many people.

Now that I have a microchip, anyone want to put a leash on me and take me for a run?

Don’t Be Poky About College Tuition Planning

Disclosure: This post is sponsored by the Florida Prepaid College Board, through my role as a Believer Blogger. All thoughts are my own.

Don't Be Poky About College Tuition Planning

A friend of mine has a new baby daughter, and friends throughout the nation are donating books to the library at his town’s elementary school in her honor. When I went to buy the books I am donating, I went to our Barnes and Noble here in Tallahassee because they are participating in a statewide book fair benefiting the Florida Prepaid College Foundation.

I chose a Poky Little Puppy book because that little puppy always pulled at my heartstrings. I chose Flat Stanley because I loved doing Flat Stanley with my kids. And I chose Who Was Anne Frank? because it was The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank that first opened my eyes to the lessons of the Holocaust and instilled my drive to become a woman who believed, like Anne, “In spite of everything I still believe that people are really good at heart.”

My friend’s daughter will, in a blink, find herself moving on from the Poky Little Puppy to these books as she prepares for college:

Don't Be Poky About College Tuition Planning

As I wrote in my first Blogger Believer post, because my parents bought a Florida Prepaid plan for my daughter when she was a newborn, our family had the security of knowing that her tuition would be paid for when she enrolled at Valdosta State University.

As the February 28 deadline to purchase a Florida Prepaid College plan approaches, please take a minute to consider these two action steps if you are a Florida resident with a child in your life who plans to go to college.

Enter The Florida Prepaid Scholarship Giveaway by February 18!

The Florida Prepaid College Foundation is having a scholarship giveaway!  Ten winners will each receive a 1-Year Florida University Plan. You can enter the giveaway daily via this link. Don’t be poky like the little puppy; enter by February 18!

Enroll in the Florida Prepaid College Plan by February 28!

Open enrollment closes on February 28, 2015. Prices are currently the lowest they have been since 2007. There are five plans from which to choose, including a new 1-Year Florida University Plan costing as little as $43 a month for a newborn.

For more information, visit the Florida Prepaid College Plan by clicking here. If you prefer to speak with someone by phone, please call 800-552-GRAD (4723).

Now that Tenley is a freshman in college and Wayne is a sophomore in high school, I miss the days of the Poky Little Puppy, learning about the world through Flat Stanley, and helping my kids navigate those first forays into history. As a family, we have turned the page on that time of our lives.

If your child’s education plan has unwritten chapters, consider a Florida Prepaid Plan for a happy ending.

Don't Be Poky About College Tuition Planning

Becoming #BetterThanBefore

I was intrigued recently when a friend and co-worker shared Gretchen Rubin’s “Four Tendencies” Quiz. The quiz is intended to give us insights into our tendencies, which can then help us develop “habit strategies” which can help us improve our lives.

I find these types of tools interesting, and I especially find them interesting when coworkers map their results. When I have done this in the past, it has given me insight into the allegiances (and tensions) I experienced in work situations.

According to Gretchen’s post introducing the quiz:

In a nutshell, it [the quiz] distinguishes how people tend to respond to expectations: outer expectations (a deadline, a “request” from a sweetheart) and inner expectations (write a novel in your free time, keep a New Year’s resolution).

Your response to expectations may sound slightly obscure, but it turns out to be very, very important.

Four Tendencies

Upholders respond readily to outer and inner expectations 
Questioners question all expectations; they’ll meet an expectation if they think it makes sense–essentially, they make all expectations into inner expectations
Obligers meet outer expectations, but struggle to meet expectations they impose on themselves
Rebels resist all expectations, outer and inner alike

 

I will tell you that although this week had its tremendously affirming high points (like being a part of the #CYCLEFORFSUTLH team that raised more than $31,000 to benefit Ronny Ahmed and the family of Deputy Chris Smith), there have been multiple instances personally and professionally where I thought I could be a recurring subject of this twitter account:

You Had One Job

It came as no surprise to me that my quiz result was “upholder” (respond readily to outer and inner expectations) but in all honesty, there’s a lot of “obliger” (meet outer expectations, but struggle to meet expectations they impose on themselves) mixed in as well.

I suppose it is not uncommon to be more highly motivated by the things we want to do rather than the things we have to do. I have been fortunate since leaving my job in May 2014 to be able to change up the “want to/have to” mix, but the mix is constantly in flux and I suppose we never stop wanting to improve (this is why I like the hashtag associated with this quiz and Gretchen’s upcoming book: #BetterThanBefore).

A few observations from my detailed “upholder” report resonated with me (and a few didn’t).

Most Powerful:

Upholders may struggle in situations where expectations aren’t clear. They may feel compelled to meet expectations, even ones that seem pointless. They may feel uneasy when they know they’re breaking the rules, even unnecessary rules. There’s a relentless quality to Upholder-ness, which can be tiring both to Upholders and the people around them.

Why this resonates with  me: oh, the relentlessness. While I don’t feel apologetic about the things I choose to be relentless about, my execution sometimes could use refining and relentlessness can be pretty hard on a person’s energy budget. For the unnecessary rules, here’s an example. Back when our Healthy Kids offices were moving from one building to another, something was going on in the new building that had led management to say “don’t use the elevators.” The moving staff, who had a truckload of heavy furniture to get up to the second floor, laughed when I repeated the sign’s instruction to use the stairs instead. I am pretty sure I am recalling their words correctly when I quote: “Well, feel free to do it yourself then if the elevator isn’t available.”

The Big Big “But”

Gretchen Rubin points out that Upholders are actually somewhat rare and are frequently mistaken for Obligers, who struggle to meet expectations they impose on themselves:

She writes: Upholders and Obligers are the two Tendencies that readily meet external expectations, so they have much in common. In fact, Obligers sometimes mistake themselves for Upholders. If this description of Upholders doesn’t quite ring true to you, as a description of yourself, you may be an Obliger. (Also, very few people are Upholders, and many, many, people are Obligers.) The key difference is: How do you respond to an expectation you impose on yourself?” If you readily meet that expectation, you’re an Upholder. If you struggle to meet that expectation, you’re an Obliger.

Take a stroll through my head (ha! have fun in there!) and you just may agree “obliger” is a better fit.

I know the point of Gretchen’s work is to understand ourselves better and then to change our lives by changing our habits. I frankly am not sure how to process the habits piece of it all right now, but am going to take a quick stab at it. There are three types of habit strategies Gretchen recommends:

  • Strategy of Scheduling
  • Strategy of Monitoring
  • Strategy of the Clean Slate

The scheduling strategy, I can see. Being a telecommuting worker and a caretaker makes my day feel like Swiss cheese often, and I think there are actions I can take to help make more sense of out my days even though there are some commitments that are inflexible.

The monitoring strategy — yes. At least in my fitness world, I love being accountable to my KR Endurance teammates, my fellow #Fitfluential ambassadors, and Gareth, who I run for. I think there are some concrete actions I can take regarding monitoring my own work responsibilities that may help me feel more in control.

The clean slate strategy. Well, leaving my job in May 2014 accomplished a piece of that. My daughter’s move away to college created a bit of a clean slate because it changed our family’s day-to-day dynamics so much. I have a fantasy of doing a spiritual retreat that will give me 24 hours to sit with all the thoughts in my head; maybe doing that would be a way to create a mental clean slate.

In closing, I am not being compensated for discussing Gretchen’s book. I do plan to read it when it becomes available in March (details here). I was simply intrigued by this particular way of looking at personalities and the role of habit in becoming the best people we can be.

If you are interested in your results, you can take the quiz here.

What are your thoughts on the four tendencies? Let me know in the comments!

better than before

What Team SOAR Means To Me

As I shared in this post, I am participating in the 2015 United Airlines New York City Half Marathon to benefit The Leukemia and Lymphoma Society and honor my friend Mary Jane. I will be a part of Team SOAR. Today I am going to break down that logo as I share my efforts to secure funding to help find a cure, support those currently living with blood cancers, and spread advocacy.

What Team SOAR Means To Me

 

The “SWhat Team SOAR Means To Me” in SOAR stands for “spirited” and we’ve got spirits, yes we do! I am excited that details have been finalized regarding the Tequila Social to benefit the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society (LLS)! Join me at Madison Social on 2/7/15 at 6 pm or 7:30 pm for tequila flights, tasty food offerings, friendship, and the knowledge that you are helping this awesome cause (Madison Social is generously donating a portion of the proceeds to LLS).

 

What Team SOAR Means To Me

 

As the “voice” of The Optimism Light, you can bet the “O” for “Optimistic” means something to me! While I do not know all of the members of Team SOAR yet (I am one of the few team members who does not live in or around Long Island), I see their training. I see their spirit, I see the fact that despite the challenges that blood cancers bring, they face the future with optimism (as well as a heaping supply of love).

 

 

What Team SOAR Means To MeAre you wondering what I am going to do for AND? Don’t worry, I have a plan!! We have spiritsoptimism, AND other ways to contribute! There are still spaces available in the Be My Valentine Couples Circuit Class at 10 am on 2/7/15 (details at Badass Fitness) $10 will get you a workout and fun! Also, for every $5 donated from now until the sheet is full, you get a square on my Superbowl Squares sheet. Whoever matches the half time score gets $100 and whoever matches the final score gets $100. You can donate here and I’ll confirm that I’ve entered your squares!

What Team SOAR Means To Me

 

Finally, relentless. Mary Jane is not the only friend I have who has had to look cancer squarely in its ugly face and decide whether to succumb or choose to fight, relentlessly. For her, for my mother, for the legions of children, adults, relatives, and strangers who have been affected by cancer, I choose relentless.

 

 

Even though I won’t meet most of these people in person until March, I am proud to be SOARing with this team (and looking at this picture, I’m not so sorry my training is in Florida!). I appreciate any support you can give!

What Team SOAR Means To Me

Moose The Loser

Wow, if the title of this blog is a symbol of the way I treat my friends, they’re going to start dropping like flies!

I don’t want people to drop from my life like flies (of course) but I do want something to drop, and that is my friend the weight of my friend Greg (a/k/a Big Moose).

Tallahassee Health Kwest

Greg wants his weight to drop too, and that’s why he is applying to be the Tallahassee representative in the 5th Annual Genghis Grill Health Kwest. If selected to represent Tallahassee, Greg will get a free healthy meal at Genghis Grill every day for 60 days, will track his progress on social media, and will be able to compete to win $10,000 (by accumulating the most points).

I am positive that the $10,000 prize (awesome as that would be!) is not what is motivating Greg. He is motivated by something priceless: the ability to play with his young son and see him grow up.  This is what he said in his application:

My son is now almost 4 years old, and is getting to the point where he wants to go to amusement parks, play (and play HARD) at the park, and just run around like 4 year olds do. This is GREAT, my son is a very active 4 year old…I, unfortunately am not the average dad. Going on rides is out of the question as I just don’t fit, and playing at the park or running around is short lived because I just can’t keep up, and that’s just not fair to him.

Tallahassee Health Kwest

Greg and I first met on Twitter (that breeding ground of many fun exchanges that sometimes leads to great friendships). We did The Color Run together in 2012 and had a blast!

Tallahassee Health Kwest

Team WTF (Where’s The Finish?) September 2013

For Greg to be chosen to represent Tallahassee, Genghis Grill will be evaluating his awesome application in addition to his social media presence. There’s no reason we can’t all pitch in and help him make it into the finals!

Here are the ways to help:

1) Go to this link, comment, then pin, tweet, and share away between now and January 26!

2) Join us Tuesday night, January 20, at 7 p.m., at the Tallahassee Genghis Grill location (830 E. Lafayette Street) to dine together and show Genghis Grill that Greg has great potential to be a “loser“! Here’s a link to the event. Even if you can’t come, please share it with anyone who can!

3) Click here to tweet the following:

greg revised tweet

 

A last note from me: I have had so much fun with Big Moose on Twitter, in person at The Color Run and (ironically considering the purpose of this post) scarfing down food at Dunkin Donuts during a promotion! Behind all that fun, I so respect his work ethic, his devotion to his family, and the fact that he’s an all around good guy….

…..an all around good guy who I want to be a loser in the best way!

Tallahassee Health Kwest

Is It Crazy To Think An Online Community Can Succeed?

One of my tasks with Weaving Influence is helping to manage the Lead Change Group community. This is a fairly new role for me, and taking it on has me thinking almost constantly about what makes an online community work.

Although in my opinion the success of an online community boils down to a handful of characteristics that sound very simple, there is something intangible that has to take place between assembling the right “ingredients,” following a trustworthy “recipe,” and “cooking” everything to result in a tasty product. These include:

A Cyber Welcome Mat

Although I believe it is important that there be a cadre of “regulars” who contribute to the community, there should be plenty of acceptance and respect to make someone who is visiting for the first time feel welcome. (Many people probably read your posts frequently before venturing to comment.) I have been active in one of my favorite online communities (more on that later) long enough to know many of the “inside jokes” that would mystify a newcomer. The inside jokes are part of what makes the community fun, but there’s a fine line between inside jokes that make you want to keep coming back in order to “get them” and inside jokes that are so plentiful, pointed, or cryptic that a newbie can feel excluded.

People Keep Showing Up

This is the next part after the welcome mat. People like what they read, how they are treated, and how they feel after interacting with your community. You know you can count on seeing some of the same people week after week, and connections grow deeper roots that way.

Good Writing

This language freak has long ago given up on grammatical perfection in the online world, so I am not referring to a draconian management of spelling and grammar (although consistently sloppy use of language is a turn-off). I am referring to good writing. The kind that makes you laugh at your desk, that makes you stop mid-post and tweet the author saying “I haven’t even gotten through this post but thank you,” the kind of words that stay with you long after you click off of the post. Writing like this Spin Sucks guest post from Cindy King.

Connecting Across Other Channels

As a blogger, I will tell you I will love you forever if you will share my post via your other social media channels (unless you’re a creeper in which case of course I won’t love you forever). There are times when I read a  Spin Sucks post that is quite technical (such as this one) and I have nothing useful to contribute but I know I can trust the content enough to share it via Google+, Twitter, Facebook, and/or Linkedin. If I am going to keep the cooking analogy going, we’ll call the “connecting across other channels” the equivalent of allowing our product’s fragrance to waft into adjoining rooms and make everyone salivate over what we’ve made!

Knowing Your Place

It would be easy as a Spin Sucks Crazy to think that the blog is all that happens at Arment Dietrich. I say that because the activity stream is constant. That’s not because the blog is all they do, though; it’s because they make sure to delegate responsibility for reining in interacting with the community throughout the day to someone on staff. I have to remind myself that the blog is only a part of what they do and respect that, although they would point out that the blog is the entryway for many business leads (80% of new revenue, to be precise — details about that in this post).

Telling Me Specifically How To Get Involved

Tonight’s post is an example of what I mean. Back when Spin Sucks posted this, I said the following:

spin sucks post

(The pigeon is a story for a different post!)

This is not the first time I have commented about doing something, and been encouraged to follow through. The very first time was when Spin Sucks rescued me from weekly habit of #FollowFridaying a long list of people by publishing this post which in addition to convincing me to rethink how I was using Follow Friday, instilled in me a secret little goal to get featured (which I did, here).

Moderating Closely

It is no small task to moderate the comments section of a blog. There is no faster way to lose me as an online community member than to make me wade through a stream of trolls, spam, and other trash. An unadulterated comments section does not happen by accident; it takes work. And I appreciate that.

green pen two cropped

As a new community manager, I can tell you that I am hungry for the people in my community to blend their unique ingredients more thoroughly. There’s so much great content; staring at a comments section with a line of “0’s” on my dashboard makes me sad. There are many times during a week when I utter a little prayer that the Lead Change Group community will acquire some of the attributes that make Spin Sucks great: dynamic people, talking to one another, evolving into something more than a set of comments on a blog.

Want to help me out with whipping up something delectable at the Lead Change Group? Here’s a recent post that provided useful tips for helping people work to their fullest potential. Take a moment to share your thoughts in the comments?

And I would be remiss if I didn’t give a last “thank you” to Spin Sucks for being such a tremendous example of an online community that works. I would also be remiss if I didn’t try to earn some brownie points (because I love brownie points!) by asking you to tweet the following:

tweet

(Click here to tweet!)

101_3367

Yummm…….brownies!

Why I Am Gettin’ Dirty**

**This is definitely a G-Rated post. I just love the catchy title!

I had one attendant at my wedding on August 8, 1992, on the Brooklyn Promenade in New York City, Mary Jane. Mary Jane and I had worked together at Fordham University for almost three years. We had shared many laughs, a few tears, and quite a few conversations about our mutual love of figure skating. I do have a serious picture of us taken that day:

Multiple Myeloma Advocacy

Photo Credit: Dan Carubia

But it is pictures like this that most capture Mary Jane’s enthusiasm (I wonder what she, my friend Audrey, and my friend Jennie were reacting to):

Multiple Myeloma Advocacy

Photo Credit: Dan Carubia

Although my return to Florida from New York and the busy nature of our lives as we each pursued our careers and grew our families kept us from seeing each other very much, we have always been there for one another, and especially enjoyed meeting up twice for the National Figure Skating Championships (we were in Detroit when the Nancy Kerrigan/Tonya Harding situation went down).

A few years ago, Mary Jane called me with very serious news: she had been diagnosed with Multiple Myeloma (I didn’t know what it was and had to ask). After a demanding, grueling course of treatment, she is in an excellent place, all things considered. However, there is no cure for Multiple Myeloma and true to her enthusiastic nature (see picture above), she has gone “all in” for participating with Team in Training to help fund research, support, and advocacy for The Leukemia and Lymphoma Society.

I have lost track of the number of Team in Training events Mary Jane has already done, the number of people she has mentored, and the amount of money she has raised. I can be certain, though, that it is a lot and that she brought fun and encouragement to every single event. (The 13 minutes it takes to watch her Inspiration Speech is worth it, I PROMISE.) 

For my 50th birthday in November, I asked my family to send me back to my favorite place (New York City). I am always ecstatic to be in New York City but this trip has a purpose: I will be participating in the 2015 New York City Half Marathon with Mary Jane and Team SOAR (Spirited Optimistic And Relentless) For A Cure.

I was thinking about my participation with Team SOAR this Saturday when I ran the Swamp Forest Trail Race. Although race day wasn’t as frigid as it was in 2014, a surplus of rain in Tallahassee had made the trail muddy and treacherous. In addition, the heart rate issues I have been struggling with cropped up at a point in the race when I was feeling incredible and forced me to switch to a run/walk strategy 2/3 of the way in. Even though the race wasn’t easy, and my body did not cooperate with my race plan, I was thrilled to be making my debut as a member of Team in Training, wearing my TnT shirt. I don’t figure anyone who has dealt with leukemia, lymphoma, or other blood cancers really felt that their body was cooperating with them, either, so it’s time to stop spinning around in circles of frustration and direct my energies toward making a difference.

I have committed to raise $2,500 for The Leukemia and Lymphoma Society as part of my participation in the New York City Half Marathon. Here is my plan as it stands now:

1) I am accepting donations via this link. Seriously, no amount is too small.

2) There will be a “pairs” workout on Saturday, February 7 at Badass Fitness at 10 a.m. This is the first “gettin’ dirty (by gettin’ sweaty) opportunity. In a pre-Valentines Day workout, couples (it can be spouses, friends, siblings, whatever) can partake in pairs-based exercises. A portion of proceeds will benefit the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. Sign-up is OPEN. Visit Badass Fitness, click “Sign Up For A Badass Fitness Class” and follow the prompts for the 2/7 class at 10 am!

3) Please join my Gettin’ Dirty Benefit at Madison Social. The date is 2/7 (you know, work out in the morning, drink in the evening!) and one featured bevvie is Dirty Tequila. A generous portion of the proceeds will go to the Leukemia and Lymphoma society. Here’s the link for tickets ($25 per person and a portion to goes to LLS).

I raised $500 for Autism Speaks in 2012 for my Boston Half Marathon. That was hard. $2,500 will be harder. But when it comes to a priceless friendship, I’m all in to do the work.

Multiple Myeloma Advocacy

Photo Credit: Fred Deckert

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The Finish Line of 2014

This is my last post of 2014. This weekend’s experience participating in the Biggest Loser Run Walk Half Marathon in Panama City Beach encapsulated so much of my year.

2014 Review

I Got To Travel

I love traveling so much. Getting to take a quick road-trip to Panama City Beach in order to participate in this race fed a bite-sized morsel to the voracious travel lover in me. Packet pick-up was at the Edgewater Beach and Golf Resort, home of several memorable gymnastics experiences back in my Gym Mom days. Wow did that make me nostalgic.

2014 Review

Packet Pickup at The Edgewater Beach Resort and Meeting Danni Allen, Winner of Biggest Loser Season 14

I Got To Run

Running is so central to who I am. A trip that does not involve running is very likely not a trip I am on! It was so nice to enjoy the sound of the ocean waves as we traversed Front Beach Road throughout the half marathon course, to share my friend Tabitha’s first ever half marathon (yay!), and to experience just a little bit of relief from the stress that has hung over my races and runs since the Turkey Trot. (Note for anyone following the health part of the Turkey Trot post, I have an appointment with an electrophysiologist on January 6 and will hopefully get closer to having some answers.)

2014 Review

Tabitha (white visor), Robin (pink visor), Minnie Pinnie (pink and blue harness) and I mid-race!

I Got To Cuddle With A Dog

Okay, cuddling with a dog doesn’t represent a component of my year, but spending a half marathon with Minnie Pinnie was a SURPRISE! Oh how I love this 5-month-old, 4 pound bundle of awesomeness who did the entire 13.1 miles (carried for much of it) in a tutu that matched her mom’s. She made every single person who passed her smile (even the ones who mistook her for a chihuahua). She spent the ride back to Tallahassee curled up in my lap, fast asleep (admittedly, I did a little snoozing too). Takeaway for the year? Be open to new surprises. This “not a dog person” was won over in short order.

2014 Review

I Got To Support My Friends and Be Supported By Them

Ostensibly I was doing this race to support Tabitha as she ran her first half, but making the arrangements reminded me that it is okay to ask for help sometimes. Neither of our cars is really up to a long trip, and I was hoping to make it cost effective by sharing a hotel room, so I asked for help. All of that worked out, and moments along the way, such as this exchange with my dear friend Arlene, said “support” without saying a word:

2014 Review

I Got To Be Myself

As I wrote about in this post and this post, some of my struggles this year have been related to insecurity and lack of feeling accepted, with a dash of the feeling that I am more “myself,” and less inhibited on social media than I am with the people I spend time with in real life. The camaraderie, jokes, and shared moments of this weekend built rather than eroded; that was a plus.

2014 Review

Race eve dinner!

I Got To Write About It

This should be self-explanatory. The finish line of the last race of 2014 behind me, now I write. Although it’s true I will write about anything, but deeper truth is that I am inclined to write regarding just about everything. Look for that to continue in 2015.

Lastly, I Am Looking Ahead to Making The Finish Line Count

In thinking back through this weekend’s half marathon, I have noted how it captured many of the parts of 2014 I loved, including travel, running, friends, and writing. One of my main projects for 2015 will be participating in the 2015 New York City Half Marathon as part of Team SOAR which is running for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. What do you know? I get to travel to it, get to run at it, will be with friends old and new, and will inevitably write about it! It’ll have everything except the miniature pinscher! (I do have a commitment to fulfill in support of the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society in order to participate, though. Here’s my link if you feel inclined to donate — no amount is too small!). I just received my training shirt today, and it seems perfect as I start 2015:

2014 Review

 See you next year!