How 7 SmartBrief stories inspired me to do more

I read many news articles every day due to my work. I can either let them influence me to do things more often or persuade me to cut down. Looking over the most thought-provoking SmartBrief stories I encountered in February, I’m going for “more often” rather than “cutting down.”

I can:

Be open to disposing of outdated ideas and considering a new, more inclusive perspective

In the International City/County Management Association SmartBrief, there was a story about how Sandusky, Ohio, had chosen to end Columbus Day in favor of making Election Day a paid holiday.

Columbus Day was never all that big of a deal here in Florida. I don’t think I ever had it off (but I think the kids’ schools scheduled teacher planning days on Columbus Day). There’s a bigger question here, though, of how we as a society treat a day that many places have renamed “Indigenous People’s Day” and how much effort we expend to give people an opportunity to vote. In the long run, I think voting wins. 

Refuse to rule out the power of the tiniest clues

In the Sigma Xi Society SmartBrief, there was a story about unusual coyotes in Texas that, as it turns out, have DNA from extinct red wolves. The article discussed how the researcher who has been collecting genetic data on wolves and coyotes in North America prefers tissue samples over photographs when people ask for her help in identifying “wolflike animals.” In the case of the unusual coyotes in Texas, though, a biologist on Galveston Island, Texas, lost the tissue samples of one of the animals who was killed by a car, so couldn’t send them to the researcher.

Here’s how she got the information she needed: “He later lost one of the samples, but was able to send the scalpel he’d used on the animal’s carcass instead.” (Lo and behold, the “unusual coyotes” may possibly share DNA with the extinct red wolves.)

Who keeps their scalpels lying around without cleaning them? It paid off big-time here, but the survival of this woman’s research (at least in this instance) was hanging on the chance that a fellow scientist didn’t clean his scalpel right away. Hmmm.

Trust the evidence: Hope is real!

In the National Association of Social Workers SmartBrief, we discussed Professor Chan Hellman’s assertion that hope is evidence-based. “Hope scores are significant predictors of average daily attainment and GPA,” he said.

I especially loved this quote from the article: “Hope is a social gift. It’s not something that takes place in isolation within you, it’s something that we share.” I’m not even sure what it means, but “hope is a social gift” seems like a gift worth giving.

February 2019 SmartBrief wrapup

Always demonstrate a spirit of collaboration

I learned through the BoardSource SmartBrief that Henry Timms is leaving the 92nd Street Y to become the Lincoln Center president.

I have always heard great things about Henry Timms, and I know he has made a big difference for the 92nd Street Y. I wish I could go to the city more often and do more things there. I did get to go to the Social Good Summit there in 2015, which was a thrill.

February 2019 SmartBrief Wrapup

At the 92nd Street Y for the Social Good Summit. Probably the closest I will ever be to Victoria Beckham in my life!

The Lincoln Center board chair, in discussing the challenges Timms has faced in the past, said, “His temperament is one of collaboration; he seems to have a low ego need.” I think this type of collaboration and a “low ego need” probably serve people well. 

Speak up to end debilitating practices

In the UN Wire SmartBrief, we shared the observation of the International Day of Zero Tolerance For Female Genital Mutilation.

The practice of FGM has affected around 200 million women and girls, and the UN wants it gone by 2030. I do too, and I can do more to help bring about an end to this barbaric practice.

Be a proponent of metrics over anecdotal evidence

I have learned so much about first responders and the issues they face from the National Emergency Number Association SmartBrief. Consolidation of public safety centers is a common theme (ours here in Tallahassee has had its ups and downs since its creation in 2013), and this article explained how to make consolidations as smooth as possible.

The part of this article that most stuck out to me was “our memory does not provide an honest assessment.” It was written to explain how people who have begun working in a consolidated situation don’t always accurately remember how things worked prior to consolidation. The point was the need for an honest assessment and the development of realistic metrics. This is true beyond the emergency management world. 

Help remove mental health stigma, especially for the military and veterans

In the Reserve Officer Association SmartBrief, one of the stories discussed reports of death by suicide of 11 Air Force airmen and four civilian workers in January. “We need an Air Force culture where it is more common to seek help than to try to go at it alone,” said Air Force leaders.

I wish I didn’t even have to say this, but we have to figure out a way in this country to destigmatize mental illness. This is especially true for people in the military and veterans. The National Alliance on Mental Illness has resources for Veterans and Active Duty. Team Red White & Blue also works with active-duty military and veterans for a variety of needs. Make a donation, volunteer in some way, be there for a friend who is active duty or a veteran. 

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That’s my list of seven but I have a bonus.

I filled in for a colleague editing the SmartBrief on Entrepreneurs newsletter for a bit, and I read How these three women faced their fears to pursue their dreams. I could have put it in a relatively generic category of “motivational pieces about women who are entrepreneurs.” Something one of the women said, though, left me wondering why it has to be that way:

“I’m scared all the time.”

In fairness to her, it doesn’t sound quite so stark when considered in the context of the rest of her advice: “Don’t be ashamed of being scared; cultivate belief in yourself. Today, it’s possible to learn almost anything online. ‘I’m scared all the time. Just do the thing you know you need to do anyway,’ she says.”

I’m past the point in my life where being “scared all the time” makes sense for me. There’s a difference between the relatively healthy uncertainty that comes with embarking on a new effort and being in a constant state of fear. I hope it works out for her, but I don’t plan to follow that path.

Balancing fear and confidence

There are things we can do to find equilibrium between assurance and anxiety. As these seven stories show, finding that balance may lie in embracing the things we can do more of rather than living a life of scratching things off the list.

February 2019 SmartBrief Wrapup

Openings at SmartBrief

When I share my wrap-ups of favorite SmartBrief stories, I also include our open positions. I wrote in more detail about my experience here.

Here are our currently advertised open positions (they’re all located in Washington, D.C.):

If you are interested in applying, please list me as your referrer or email me so we can discuss further.

To Recap

To subscribe to one (or more) SmartBrief newsletters, including the “end of the work day” While You Were Working, for which I am a contributing editor, click here.

If you aren’t in a subscribing mood, you can still keep up with us on FacebookSmartBrief TwitterLeadership SmartBrief TwitterLinkedIn and SmartBrief Instagram and Life at SmartBrief Instagram. (There’s also a SmartBrief feature at The Muse.)

Thanks for reading, and I hope (in an evidence-based kind of way!) to play a part in keeping you informed long into the future!

February 2019 Smartbrief Wrapup

This post is a response to the Kat Bouska prompt “7 things to do more often.”

*Note: My opinions about the stories are my personal viewpoint; they do not reflect an endorsement by my employer.

**Also — I know there’s something odd going on with the spacing on my post(s). I see those extra spaces and plan to eradicate them … as soon as I figure out how!

SmartBrief: My Favorite Stories (And Open Positions)

In October, I shared a post recapping my favorite SmartBrief stories among the briefs I edit. Since a little more than a month has elapsed, here is an update about my latest favorites.

From ASPA (The American Society of Public Administrators)

Opportunity Zones take another step as IRS releases rule proposal

Why it’s so interesting: I have to admit … before starting to edit the ASPA newsletter, I wouldn’t have known an “opportunity zone” if it struck me in the face. Short version: Opportunity zones, created in late 2017 by the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, are “economically-distressed communit[ies] where new investments, under certain conditions, may be eligible for preferential tax treatment.” OZs are going to be complicated, and it’s hard to say (yet) whether they will pan out to do what they are intended to do, but it’s exciting to think about the possibilities.

From Sigma Xi Science Honor Society

Bodies burn more calories later in the day, study suggests

Why it’s so interesting: Sometimes, it’s not the findings of a study that fascinate me so much, but the methodology. For this study, which found our bodies burn more calories in the late afternoon than early evening, the seven study participants spent a month in a windowless, clock-free lab, having their schedules manipulated and all kinds of things measured. A MONTH IN A WINDOWLESS, CLOCK-FREE LAB. That’s sacrificing for science.

From the National Association of Social Workers

Carolina Panthers tackle player mental health

Why it’s so interesting: I know NFL players earn plenty of money, but they also endure intense pressure, emotionally and physically. The Carolina Panthers were the first NFL team to hire a full-time psychologist. NFL Players Association director of wellness Nyaka NiiLampti said, “mental health is health.” I love that message and believe it, whether we’re talking football, accounting or trash collecting. 

From UN Wire

UNEP: Meat, dairy production driving climate change

I’m not prefacing this with “why it’s so interesting” because it’s more important for me to share that editing this newsletter a) breaks my heart on the regular and b) leave me amazed that I get paid to do this (I have been involved in United Nations Foundation causes for years). This story opened my eyes to the ways the production of meat contributes to heavy water usage and rainforest deforestation. It’s a newsletter that simultaneously leaves me worried about the state of the world and optimistic that causes including the environment, poverty, education of girls, and health have champions.  

From BoardSource

Commentary: Philanthropy must directly face anti-black racism

Why it’s so interesting: This piece does not mince words, and I found it courageous that BoardSource asked for it to be included. It is just a stroke of good fortune, and not something I have the right to expect, to be asked to work with a piece of content that so closely aligns with my personal values. I’ll take it. Excerpt: “…many people face challenges because of the color of their skin, their ethnicity, their sexual identity, and so much more — but that treatment squarely rests, in fact has been perfected over centuries, on racism specifically directed against black people.” 

From the Reserve Officers Association

Study: Meditation could help alleviate PTSD

Why it’s so interesting: The transition back to civilian life is so difficult for many veterans, and meditation is such a powerful resource. In a study, PTSD symptoms were reduced 61% among veterans who practiced meditation as part of the study.  

From the National Emergency Number Association

Commentary: New title for 9-1-1 operators would denote professionalism

Why it’s so interesting: I have learned so much about the world of emergency management, and especially the unique stresses dispatchers face, working on this newsletter. This opinion piece advocates for changing the way dispatchers’ jobs are classified from “clerical” to “protective service professional,” which would make progress toward helping recruit qualified dispatchers and keep wait times for emergency response from growing longer and jeopardizing people’s health. I’m pretty sure every dispatcher I know would agree. 

From the International City/County Management Association

Petaluma, Calif., manager retires after 35 years in public service

I saved this one for last for a reason.It sounds pretty routine, right? City managers retire all the time. But for that city and for that manager, this is a major milestone. I had to confirm the date of the meeting where a proclamation was presented about his service, so I found myself watching the livestream of the presentation. I wondered what went through the mind of John Brown of Petaluma, Calif., as he was celebrated. The man orchestrated the replenishment of the city’s reserves after they fell from $8.5 million to $5,000 in 2008. Now they’re on target to be at $8.7 million next year. It may not be the most unique story we publish in a SmartBrief newsletter, but a man who gave all of his professional life to building communities and the hard, difficult work of getting a city’s finances in line deserves two sentences. Congratulations, Mr. Brown of Petaluma.

Digital Journalism Job Openings

About Working at SmartBrief and Our Current Openings

In my previous post, I wrote about our open positions and why I am so pleased to be a part of it all. Here’s an update.

digital journalism job openings

SmartBrief’s Open Position(s)

SmartBrief now has a similar position to mine open, for a Media Editor.

If you have experience as an editor and an interest in digital journalism, as well as expertise with media news and trends, I encourage you to learn more about the position and apply. (Please use my name as your referral contact. Don’t hesitate to get in touch with me if you have questions.)

The Media Editor position is slated to be in the Washington, D.C., office, but the ideal candidate might be permitted to telecommute.

Note: There are several other open positions in the D.C. office. I assume most of my contacts will be interested in the Media Editor position, but here are the others:

And in the New York office:

About My Experience

When I was sending an email to a few contacts in October, to share the open position(s), it occurred to me that some people are not aware of SmartBrief. Therefore, I wrote a bit in the email about my experience. This is an excerpt of what I said:

Although I just started as a full-time editor with SmartBrief in September, I was working as a freelance searcher, writer and editor before that (since January 2017).
I know people vary in the path they take to find a job that is rewarding and enjoyable. For me, working as a freelancer because I was still taking care of my father-in-law turned out to be the best of all worlds. It showed me why I wanted to apply for a full-time position and introduced me to a product I believe in wholeheartedly, working with other people who have the same focused commitment.
To learn more about what we do, visit the main site here.

 

To Recap

To follow up on the Media Editor position, click here.

To subscribe to one (or more) SmartBrief newsletters, including our newest, the “end of the work day” While You Were Working, for which I am a contributing editor, click here.

If you aren’t in a subscribing mood, you can still keep up with us on Facebook, SmartBrief Twitter, Leadership SmartBrief Twitter, LinkedIn and SmartBrief Instagram and Life at SmartBrief Instagram. (There’s also a SmartBrief feature at The Muse.)

Thanks for reading, and I hope to play a part in keeping you informed long into the future!

SmartBrief: Open Positions and My Favorite Stories

I never expected events to unfurl the way they did after I left Healthy Kids in May 2014. One of the goals of leaving after working there for almost 20 years was to find a way to  earn a living that aligned more effectively with the things I loved doing.

When my father-in-law moved in with us three weeks later due to a rapid decline in his health, my options became my more limited. We either needed to get full-time care for him both Wayne and I could be working outside the home, or I had to do work from home so we could supervise and care for Dad.

Besides everything I learned about caregiving (and about myself) over that time, I also gained experience about freelance life. The most important result of that period of time is the fact that we were able (hopefully) to give Dad an end-of-life experience that was as comfortable as it could be, given his health issues. Secondly, though, in retrospect, I ended up exactly where I needed to be, as a full-time editor at SmartBrief. It’s funny how life works, right?Digital Journalism Jobs

SmartBrief’s Open Position(s)

SmartBrief now has a similar position to mine open, for a Media Editor.

If you have experience as an editor and an interest in digital journalism, as well as expertise with media news and trends, I encourage you to learn more about the position and apply. (Please use my name as your referral contact. Don’t hesitate to get in touch with me if you have questions.)

The Media Editor position is slated to be in the Washington, D.C., office, but the ideal candidate may be permitted to telecommute.

Note: There are several other open positions in the D.C. office. I assume most of my contacts will be interested in the editor position, but here are the others:

About My Experience

When I was sending an email to a few contacts, to share the open position(s), it occurred to me that some people are not aware of SmartBrief. Therefore, I wrote a bit in the email about my experience and about some of my favorite stories.

This is what I shared. Maybe I’ll come in occasionally and update the “favorite stories” part, in addition to the listings for open positions. We’ll see. For now, this is what I said:

Although I just started as a full-time editor with SmartBrief in September, I was working as a freelance searcher, writer and editor before that (since January 2017).
I know people vary in the path they take to find a job that is rewarding and enjoyable. For me, working as a freelancer because I was still taking care of my father-in-law turned out to be the best of all worlds. It showed me why I wanted to apply for a full-time position and introduced me to a product I believe in wholeheartedly, working with other people who have the same focused commitment.

Here is a link to the listing: http://bit.ly/SBMediaEditor.

If you’re not familiar with SmartBrief, I encourage you to take a look at the various daily newsletters we offer in a variety of industries. To give you a sense of the array of products we offer, here is a bit about my experience.

IBTTA
Digital Journalism Jobs

Photo credit: Pennsylvania Department of Transportation Facebook Page

Sigma Xi
Digital Journalism Jobs

 

Social Work
And true to my mental health/counseling origins, I edit the Social Work SmartBrief. (Favorite story: How animals, nature can amplify social work)

That’s just a sampling (and the “favorite story” exercise is pretty tough, to be honest!). To see everything we do, visit the main site here.

 

To Recap

To follow up on the Media Editor position, click here.

To subscribe to one (or more) SmartBrief newsletters, including our newest, the “end of the work day” While You Were Working, click here.

If you aren’t in a subscribing mood, you can still keep up with us on Facebook, SmartBrief Twitter, Leadership SmartBrief Twitter, LinkedIn and SmartBrief Instagram and Life at SmartBrief Instagram. (There’s also a SmartBrief feature at The Muse.)

Thanks for reading, and I hope to play a part in keeping you informed long into the future!