Jumping for Joy!

I have so many ideas for posts, but the more pressing issue is the 5:30 am flight I have tomorrow morning for the annual Shot at Life Champions summit!

While at the summit, I will be the advocate behind the @Vaccines Twitter account. Keep me busy — send me questions and encouragement!

I also hope to catch the first commercial-free showing of He Named Me Malala tomorrow night on the National Geographic Channel at 8 ET/7 CT! (Read more in my blog, The Magic of Malala, from a few weeks ago!).

For now, a simple thank you to the four women who shared this past weekend with me as they ran the Seaside Half Marathon and I ran the Seaside 5K. The good company, the beautiful place, and the energy of being surrounded by so many runners simply made me (and them!) JUMP FOR JOY!

Jumping for Joy

I hope something during your week makes you jump for joy! 

The Magic of Malala

Did you see Malala Yousafzai on Colbert? Take the 3:06; I’ll wait!

In this brief clip, Malala and Colbert share laughs over card tricks. I remember watching this interview last September and thinking, “if I didn’t know she had changed the world in a breathtakingly courageous and daring way, I would almost think she’s pretty much any other young adult chatting it up with a comedian.”

The thing is: Malala is not just “any other young adult.” She is the world’s youngest Nobel Peace Prize winner. As explained via her website:

On 9 October 2012, as Malala and her friends were travelling home from school, a masked gunman entered their school bus and asked for Malala by name. She was shot with a single bullet which went through her head, neck and shoulder. Two of her friends were also injured in the attack.

Malala survived the initial attack, but was in a critical condition. She was moved to Birmingham in the United Kingdom for treatment at a hospital that specialises in military injuries. She was not discharged until January, 2013 by which time she had been joined by her family in the UK.

The Taliban’s attempt to kill Malala received worldwide condemnation and led to protests across Pakistan. In the weeks after the attack, over 2 million people signed a right to education petition, and the National Assembly swiftly ratified Pakistan’s first Right To Free and Compulsory Education Bill.

This February 29, 2016, we all have an opportunity to learn more about Malala and celebrate her contributions when He Named Me Malala, Davis Guggenheim’s acclaimed film, has its commercial-free television premiere on the National Geographic channel at 8:00 pm ET/7:00 pm CT.

Here’s the trailer for the film:

If you are on Twitter, you can help spread the word with the following tweets!

#HeNamedMeMalala premieres commercial free on @natgeochannel 2/29 @ 8/7c! Stand #withMalala + watch with your family on.natgeo.com/1VbVWaJ 

#HeNamedMeMalala premiers on @natgeochannel 2/29 at 8/7c. See it and stand #withMalala! on.natgeo.com/1VbVWaJ

Mark your calendar to stand #withMalala for girls’ ed. #HeNamedMeMalala premiering on @natgeochannel on.natgeo.com/1VbVWaJ

Having a daughter who is close in age to Malala, I marvel at the opportunities my daughter has had to learn, work, and grow free of oppression. It is unthinkable that any young woman in our world has to risk death in order to get the education all children deserve, and I commend Malala for her courage, her passion, and her articulate and motivational ways.

Educating Girls

Her card tricks aren’t bad either!

Educating Girls

For more information:

About the commercial-free showing of He Named Me Malala on the National Geographic Channel, click here.

Follow The Malala Fund on Facebook by clicking here.

Follow The Malala Fund on Twitter by clicking here.

Take action to stand #WithMalala by clicking here.

Donate to The Malala Fund by clicking here.

Educating Girls