About #BlameJameis

I have been intrigued for a while with the idea of doing an “Ignite” speech. In an Ignite speech, you are bound to use no more than 20 slides over a 5 minute period, with each lasting 15 seconds. I did my first Ignite attempt at Toastmasters a few weeks ago, and have built on that speech to finalize the video presented here.

I hope you will watch the video. If you are short on time, though, and don’t have five minutes, the point is this: Florida State University, even in the worst of times, has always been about more than one person and certainly about more than one hashtag.

My suggestion for the alternative to #BlameJameis:

Here sons and daughters stand, faithful and true,
Hailing our alma mater, F.S.U.

~ FSU Alma Mater

FSU LOGO

Miss Georgia on My Mind

This is one of the least “evergreen” posts I will ever write. I am writing in support of a particular candidate for Miss America 2015. Within 48 hours, she will either wear the crown or not. In the lead-up to tomorrow night’s contest, though, I want to share what it is about her that made me a fan, and that is the most evergreen characteristic of all.

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Tiara Cookies by Crave Eatery Bainbridge, GA

I am supporting Maggie Bridges, Miss Georgia, in her quest to become Miss America. (The pageant airs the night of September 14, 2014, on ABC, at 9 p.m. EST). Here’s why:

Seven years ago, Tenley (around 11 years old) and I were returning from New York City to Tallahassee. On the Atlanta to Tallahassee leg, I was in a single seat and Tenley was across the aisle from me, seated next to another passenger. I tend to withdraw into a shell (and often sleep) on planes; I half-noticed that Tenley was chatting the whole time but didn’t think much of it.

As we were departing the airport, Tenley explained that she had been sitting next to Maggie Bridges, who was returning, traveling solo, from a modeling assignment (I think Maggie was 16 or so at the time…). I don’t know the content of their conversation, but I think it touched on modeling, fashion (maybe pageants?), and shared interests. It was a conversation mutually enjoyable enough that they went on to become Facebook friends (they are also now both Alpha Delta Pi sisters which is pretty cool!). Once Maggie won the Miss Georgia title, Tenley reminded me of that conversation all those years ago, and I instantaneously knew I would be supporting the confident and friendly young woman who gave my child her undivided attention, friendliness, and expertise.

From a pageant perspective, Maggie has going for her (among other achievements):

Photo Credit: Matt Boyd Photography

Photo Credit: Matt Boyd Photography

Intellect (She is one of ten finalists for the Miss America STEM scholarship.)

The Ability to Mobilize Support (She was one of the top three fundraisers among the Miss America contestants for Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals (CMNH), the official charity of the Miss America Organization).

Talent (I had the opportunity to hear her sing at an event benefiting CMNH back in August and she sings beautifully).

Beauty (She would not have made it this far without that!)

I know the pageant system isn’t for everyone. I participated in a pageant in college (not affiliated with the Miss America system). Although it rapidly became apparent that I didn’t have a clue what I was doing, I still, to this day am happy I had an opportunity to be in a pageant. I won’t ever forget how hard it actually is to smile without your face running away off of your head for all of the quivering your lips are doing. How energizing and adrenaline-filled it is to participate in a situation where you have to bring your very best public self. As a parent, I have always been disappointed that I did not muster up the funds and resources for Tenley to participate in a pageant like she wanted to (maybe that can still happen).

The pageant system isn’t for everyone, but it certainly is a good fit for Maggie and she for it. Maggie would make an exemplary Miss America, and I would love to see her win the crown.

Although this post won’t be evergreen, Maggie’s qualities of generosity, humor, faith, and kindness will go on and on long past September 14, 2014. They’ll continue like the pine trees of the South Georgia community where she grew up … tall, timeless, and rooted “down to earth” as far as the eye can see.

Photo Credit: Brian Brown

Photo Credit: Brian Brown

A few footnotes…

The title of this post was inspired by the “Miss Georgia On My Mind” limited edition candle created by The Refinery in Bainbridge, GA. Proceeds benefited the Still Waters program for women as well as the Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals. Check out their website here (I don’t think they are still making Miss Georgia On My Mind but they have other pleasant-smelling (and cutely named, such as Bless Your Heart!) candles).

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I have become skittish about blog posts that sing the praises of public figures. My post lauding Oscar Pistorius didn’t have the happiest of outcomes, and my post featuring Jameis Winston frankly just makes me crabby every time I think of it. The third time will be the charm with this post!

Being a Floridian (and a Seminole!), I also want to extend best wishes to Miss Florida, Victoria Cowen. I know she has worked very hard to represent Florida well and to do a wonderful job at Miss America. Good luck to you also, Tori.

Lastly, I hope karma treats Elizabeth Fechtel very, very, very kindly. She was originally crowned Miss Florida and then a calculation error was discovered which led to the title being awarded to a different competitor. I personally have been bitter over life events much more trivial; her blog post after those events will always remain in my mind as among the classiest pieces of writing I have ever read. She’s tremendous.

Shoes designed by The Sash Company for Miss America 2014 Nina Davuluri to wear in the "Show Us Your Shoes" parade -- perfect image for the "footnotes" section, right?!

Shoes designed by The Sash Company for Miss America 2014 Nina Davuluri to wear in the “Show Us Your Shoes” parade — perfect image for the “footnotes” section, right?!

Epilogue – 9/15/14 – 12:19 a.m. Maggie was not selected as a finalist in the pageant. (Congratulations, Miss New York.). I stand behind every single word I have said in this post. Class and kindness will never go out of style; Maggie epitomizes those to me.

Epilogue Number Two – 9/23/14 – 2:10 p.m. Maggie discusses her experience at the pageant on her blog. You can read the post here.

Epilogue Number Three – Maggie participated in a Google Hangout with the other Miss America STEM scholarship winners. Each of them presented an image of intellect and humor I would be proud for my daughter (or son) to emulate. You can watch the Hangout here.

 

The Heart of Leadership (A Book Review)

This week, I am happy to join other readers in discussing “The Heart of Leadership,” Mark Miller’s new book about “becoming a leader people want to follow.”

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I enjoyed the way Mark structured the book, following “Blake” through a journey of transformation that starts with a performance review in which Blake’s supervisor tells him that he is not performing to his potential. Although he is tempted to react angrily, he takes the time to think through his supervisor’s contention that “leaders are different” and decides to seek help in understanding what it is that makes leaders different.

As he speaks with various people who volunteer to help him navigate the path toward being a more effective leader, he is given some truly valuable pieces of advice. One of my favorites was:

Your missed opportunities are often no big deal in isolation.

They are, however, cumulative.

This is an area where I have struggled. When I supervised people, I know I lost opportunities to address issues when they were small. Dealing with a big issue that has mushroomed takes away time from getting the organizational mission accomplished and harms morale.

Another principle that is a thread woven through all of the people Blake speaks to on his path toward deeper understanding is “Think Others First.” I saw this concept in action last night when I watched Florida State Quarterback Jameis Winston being interviewed after FSU defeated Clemson (a very big win!). I have been somewhat out of the college football pocket for a good bit of this season and had missed seeing any of Winston’s performances this year. I had seen the social media frenzy touting him as Heisman material, the best thing to hit our football field in years, a phenom. I have to say he made that impression on me last night as I watched the game. But it was the post-game interview that really caught my attention.

After citing his religious faith, Winston repeatedly spoke of the support of his teammates, of what a great job they did, of the unity this team felt. There was not a single word in which he bragged about his outstanding performance. Jameis Winston echoed what one of Blake’s leadership mentors said: “Leadership character, once established, is hard to hide.” Winston’s leadership was shining through his words and his demeanor. (Here is another interview after the game that captures much of the same tone.)

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The Heart of Leadership is a manageably brief book to read, and it’s packed with great ideas. Aren’t you curious to know how Blake worked it all out? If so you can purchase the book through Amazon here.

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Mark Miller, well known business leader, best-selling author, and communicator, is excited about sharing The Heart of Leadership: Becoming a Leader People Want to Follow with those who are ready to take the next step. You can find it on Amazon and in bookstores everywhere.

*I received a complimentary copy of The Heart of Leadership for review purposes. The opinions expressed here are my own.