SmartBrief: My Favorite Stories (And Open Positions)

In October, I shared a post recapping my favorite SmartBrief stories among the briefs I edit. Since a little more than a month has elapsed, here is an update about my latest favorites.

From ASPA (The American Society of Public Administrators)

Opportunity Zones take another step as IRS releases rule proposal

Why it’s so interesting: I have to admit … before starting to edit the ASPA newsletter, I wouldn’t have known an “opportunity zone” if it struck me in the face. Short version: Opportunity zones, created in late 2017 by the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, are “economically-distressed communit[ies] where new investments, under certain conditions, may be eligible for preferential tax treatment.” OZs are going to be complicated, and it’s hard to say (yet) whether they will pan out to do what they are intended to do, but it’s exciting to think about the possibilities.

From Sigma Xi Science Honor Society

Bodies burn more calories later in the day, study suggests

Why it’s so interesting: Sometimes, it’s not the findings of a study that fascinate me so much, but the methodology. For this study, which found our bodies burn more calories in the late afternoon than early evening, the seven study participants spent a month in a windowless, clock-free lab, having their schedules manipulated and all kinds of things measured. A MONTH IN A WINDOWLESS, CLOCK-FREE LAB. That’s sacrificing for science.

From the National Association of Social Workers

Carolina Panthers tackle player mental health

Why it’s so interesting: I know NFL players earn plenty of money, but they also endure intense pressure, emotionally and physically. The Carolina Panthers were the first NFL team to hire a full-time psychologist. NFL Players Association director of wellness Nyaka NiiLampti said, “mental health is health.” I love that message and believe it, whether we’re talking football, accounting or trash collecting. 

From UN Wire

UNEP: Meat, dairy production driving climate change

I’m not prefacing this with “why it’s so interesting” because it’s more important for me to share that editing this newsletter a) breaks my heart on the regular and b) leave me amazed that I get paid to do this (I have been involved in United Nations Foundation causes for years). This story opened my eyes to the ways the production of meat contributes to heavy water usage and rainforest deforestation. It’s a newsletter that simultaneously leaves me worried about the state of the world and optimistic that causes including the environment, poverty, education of girls, and health have champions.  

From BoardSource

Commentary: Philanthropy must directly face anti-black racism

Why it’s so interesting: This piece does not mince words, and I found it courageous that BoardSource asked for it to be included. It is just a stroke of good fortune, and not something I have the right to expect, to be asked to work with a piece of content that so closely aligns with my personal values. I’ll take it. Excerpt: “…many people face challenges because of the color of their skin, their ethnicity, their sexual identity, and so much more — but that treatment squarely rests, in fact has been perfected over centuries, on racism specifically directed against black people.” 

From the Reserve Officers Association

Study: Meditation could help alleviate PTSD

Why it’s so interesting: The transition back to civilian life is so difficult for many veterans, and meditation is such a powerful resource. In a study, PTSD symptoms were reduced 61% among veterans who practiced meditation as part of the study.  

From the National Emergency Number Association

Commentary: New title for 9-1-1 operators would denote professionalism

Why it’s so interesting: I have learned so much about the world of emergency management, and especially the unique stresses dispatchers face, working on this newsletter. This opinion piece advocates for changing the way dispatchers’ jobs are classified from “clerical” to “protective service professional,” which would make progress toward helping recruit qualified dispatchers and keep wait times for emergency response from growing longer and jeopardizing people’s health. I’m pretty sure every dispatcher I know would agree. 

From the International City/County Management Association

Petaluma, Calif., manager retires after 35 years in public service

I saved this one for last for a reason.It sounds pretty routine, right? City managers retire all the time. But for that city and for that manager, this is a major milestone. I had to confirm the date of the meeting where a proclamation was presented about his service, so I found myself watching the livestream of the presentation. I wondered what went through the mind of John Brown of Petaluma, Calif., as he was celebrated. The man orchestrated the replenishment of the city’s reserves after they fell from $8.5 million to $5,000 in 2008. Now they’re on target to be at $8.7 million next year. It may not be the most unique story we publish in a SmartBrief newsletter, but a man who gave all of his professional life to building communities and the hard, difficult work of getting a city’s finances in line deserves two sentences. Congratulations, Mr. Brown of Petaluma.

Digital Journalism Job Openings

About Working at SmartBrief and Our Current Openings

In my previous post, I wrote about our open positions and why I am so pleased to be a part of it all. Here’s an update.

digital journalism job openings

SmartBrief’s Open Position(s)

SmartBrief now has a similar position to mine open, for a Media Editor.

If you have experience as an editor and an interest in digital journalism, as well as expertise with media news and trends, I encourage you to learn more about the position and apply. (Please use my name as your referral contact. Don’t hesitate to get in touch with me if you have questions.)

The Media Editor position is slated to be in the Washington, D.C., office, but the ideal candidate might be permitted to telecommute.

Note: There are several other open positions in the D.C. office. I assume most of my contacts will be interested in the Media Editor position, but here are the others:

And in the New York office:

About My Experience

When I was sending an email to a few contacts in October, to share the open position(s), it occurred to me that some people are not aware of SmartBrief. Therefore, I wrote a bit in the email about my experience. This is an excerpt of what I said:

Although I just started as a full-time editor with SmartBrief in September, I was working as a freelance searcher, writer and editor before that (since January 2017).
I know people vary in the path they take to find a job that is rewarding and enjoyable. For me, working as a freelancer because I was still taking care of my father-in-law turned out to be the best of all worlds. It showed me why I wanted to apply for a full-time position and introduced me to a product I believe in wholeheartedly, working with other people who have the same focused commitment.
To learn more about what we do, visit the main site here.

 

To Recap

To follow up on the Media Editor position, click here.

To subscribe to one (or more) SmartBrief newsletters, including our newest, the “end of the work day” While You Were Working, for which I am a contributing editor, click here.

If you aren’t in a subscribing mood, you can still keep up with us on Facebook, SmartBrief Twitter, Leadership SmartBrief Twitter, LinkedIn and SmartBrief Instagram and Life at SmartBrief Instagram. (There’s also a SmartBrief feature at The Muse.)

Thanks for reading, and I hope to play a part in keeping you informed long into the future!

Wife of one, Mom of two, Friend of many.

2 thoughts on “SmartBrief: My Favorite Stories (And Open Positions)

    • That’s EXACTLY what my conversations are about. My husband never knows what he’s going to get conversationally when he gets home LOL. Thanks as always for reading/commenting!

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